fbpx

Top Concrete Service

About Concrete Sidewalk Services

Stress is an everyday part of life, we all get that, but if left unchecked, it can cause some severe health issues. You might feel the effects of stress and think about ways in which you can deal with it. However, the things you do to relieve stress might not be the correct answer. You might think that scrolling Facebook is an excellent way to relax, but it’s not; if anything, your electronic devices are probably part of the cause of your stress. It’s time to ditch the smartphone, close the laptop and step out into your patio for some natural stress relief.

There are plenty of studies that show a link between exposure to the outdoors and stress reduction. In short, relief from stress occurs within minutes of exposure to the outdoors. Step into your backyard, and your blood pressure drops, muscle tension subsides, and cortisol, which is a stress hormone, levels are reduced. Being outdoors also boosts dopamine production and increases levels of endorphins, the hormones that promote happiness.

In addition to relieving stress and keeping you healthy, being outdoors provides a myriad of other benefits as well. Breathing in that fresh air has therapeutic properties, which increases your energy levels and improves positive feelings. Being outdoors also enhances creativity; sitting on your patio is a great way to restore your capacity for attention and concentration.

About Mead, CO

Mead is a drink widely considered to have been discovered prior to the advent of both agriculture and ceramic pottery in the pre-Neolithic, due to the prevalence of naturally occurring fermentation in nature and the widespread distribution of eusocial honey-producing insects worldwide;as a result, it is hard to pinpoint the exact historical origin of mead given the possibility of multiple discovery and/or potential knowledge transfer between early humans prior to recorded history. For example, mead can be produced by flooding a bee nest, and it has been speculated that late Paleolithic African hunter-gatherers possibly discovered how to make "short" or quick meads via this method, ready to drink within a few days or weeks, as a means of making water safer to drink and pleasant to consume. With the eventual rise of ceramic pottery and increasing use of fermentation in food processing to preserve surplus agricultural crops, evidence of mead begins to show up in the archaeological record more clearly, with pottery vessels from northern China dating from at least 7000 BCE discovered containing chemical signatures consistent with the presence of honey, rice, and organic compounds associated with fermentation. In Europe, mead is first described from residual samples found in ceramics of the Bell Beaker Culture (c. 2800–1800 BCE).

The earliest surviving written record of mead is possibly the soma mentioned in the hymns of the Rigveda, one of the sacred books of the historical Vedic religion and (later) Hinduism dated around 1700–1100 BCE. The Abri, a northern subgroup of the Taulantii, were known to the ancient Greek writers for their technique of preparing mead from honey. Taulantii could prepare mead, wine from honey like the Abri. During the Golden Age of ancient Greece, mead was said to be the preferred drink. Aristotle (384–322 BCE) discussed mead made in Illiria in his Meteorologica and elsewhere, while Pliny the Elder (23–79 CE) called mead militites in his Naturalis Historia and differentiated wine sweetened with honey or "honey-wine" from mead. The Hispanic-Roman naturalist Columella gave a recipe for mead in De re rustica, about 60 CE.

Ancient Greek writer Pytheas described a grain and honey drink similar to mead that he encountered while travelling in Thule. According to James Henry Ramsay this was an earlier version of Welsh metheglin. When 12 year old Prince Charles II visited Wales in 1642 Welsh metheglin was served at the feast as a symbol of Welsh presence in the emerging British identity in the years between the Union of the Crowns in 1603 and the creation of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707.

There is a poem attributed to the Welsh bard Taliesin, who lived around 550 CE, called the Kanu y med or "Song of Mead" (Cân y medd). The legendary drinking, feasting, and boasting of warriors in the mead hall is echoed in the mead hall Din Eidyn (modern-day Edinburgh) as depicted in the poem Y Gododdin, attributed to the poet Aneirin who would have been a contemporary of Taliesin. In the Old English epic poem Beowulf, the Danish warriors drank mead. In both Insular Celtic and Germanic poetry, mead was the primary heroic or divine drink, see Mead of poetry.

Mead (Old Irish mid) was a popular drink in medieval Ireland. Beekeeping was brought around the 5th century, traditionally attributed to Modomnoc, and mead came with it. A banquet hall on the Hill of Tara was known as Tech Mid Chuarda ("house of the circling of mead"). Mead was often infused with hazelnuts. Many other legends of saints mention mead, as does that of the Children of Lir.

Later, taxation and regulations governing the ingredients of alcoholic beverages led to commercial mead becoming a more obscure beverage until recently. Some monasteries kept up the traditions of mead-making as a by-product of beekeeping, especially in areas where grapes could not be grown.

REQUEST AN ESTIMATE

Just fill in your basic info and we'll do the rest.