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About Custom Walkway Installation

Stress is an everyday part of life, we all get that, but if left unchecked, it can cause some severe health issues. You might feel the effects of stress and think about ways in which you can deal with it. However, the things you do to relieve stress might not be the correct answer. You might think that scrolling Facebook is an excellent way to relax, but it’s not; if anything, your electronic devices are probably part of the cause of your stress. It’s time to ditch the smartphone, close the laptop and step out into your patio for some natural stress relief.

There are plenty of studies that show a link between exposure to the outdoors and stress reduction. In short, relief from stress occurs within minutes of exposure to the outdoors. Step into your backyard, and your blood pressure drops, muscle tension subsides, and cortisol, which is a stress hormone, levels are reduced. Being outdoors also boosts dopamine production and increases levels of endorphins, the hormones that promote happiness.

In addition to relieving stress and keeping you healthy, being outdoors provides a myriad of other benefits as well. Breathing in that fresh air has therapeutic properties, which increases your energy levels and improves positive feelings. Being outdoors also enhances creativity; sitting on your patio is a great way to restore your capacity for attention and concentration.

About Timnath, CO

Copper has been mined in the area since the 6th or 5th millennium BCE. Archaeological excavation indicates that the copper mines in Timna Valley were probably part of the Kingdom of Edom and worked by the Edomites, described as biblical foes of the Israelites, during the 10th century BCE, the period of biblical King Solomon. Mining continued by the Israelites and Nabataeans through to the 1st and 2nd centuries CE during the Roman period, and then, after the 7th-century Arab conquest, by the Umayyad Caliphate, until the copper ore became scarce.

The copper was used for ornaments, but more importantly for stone cutting, as saws, in conjunction with sand.

The recent excavations dating copper mining to the 10th century BCE also discovered what may be the earliest camel bones with signs of domestication found in Israel or even outside the Arabian peninsula, dating to around 930 BCE. This is seen as evidence by the excavators that the stories of Abraham, Joseph, Jacob and Esau were written or rewritten after this time, seeing that the Biblical books frequently reference travelling with caravans of domesticated camels.

Scientific attention and public interest was aroused in the 1930s, when Nelson Glueck attributed the copper mining at Timna to King Solomon (10th century BCE) and named the site "King Solomon's Mines". These were considered by most archaeologists to be earlier than the Solomonic period until an archaeological excavation led by Erez Ben-Yosef of Tel Aviv University found evidence indicating that this area was being mined by Edomites, a group who the Bible says were frequently at war with Israel.

In 1959, Professor Beno Rothenberg, director of the Institute for Archeo-Metallurgical Studies at University College, London, led the Arabah Expedition, sponsored by the Eretz Israel Museum, and the Tel Aviv University Institute of Archaeology. The expedition included a deep excavation of Timna Valley, and by 1990 he discovered 10,000 copper mines and smelting camps with furnaces, rock drawings, geological features, shrines, temples, an Egyptian mining sanctuary, jewellery, and other artifacts never before found anywhere in the world. His excavation and restoration of the area allowed for the reconstruction of Timna Valley's long and complex history of copper production, from the Late Neolithic period to the Middle Ages.

The modern state of Israel also began mining copper on the eastern edge of the valley in 1955, but ceased in 1976. The mine was reopened in 1980. The mine was named Timnah after a Biblical chief.

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